search: results update below


browse funds: selections are stored



recently rated:

Rated by 17
1.9
 

top rated funds:

Rated by 14
3.1

Rated by 12
3.0

Rated by 13
3.0
 

Rated by 20
3.0
 

Rated by 24
3.0

Rated by 26
3.0

Rated by 27
3.0

Rated by 43
3.0

Rated by 19
3.0

Rated by 22
3.0

Rated by 29
3.0
 

Rated by 17
3.0

Rated by 11
2.9

Rated by 21
2.9

Rated by 14
2.9

Rated by 13
2.8
 

Rated by 13
2.8
 

Rated by 12
2.8

Rated by 15
2.8
 

Rated by 38
2.8
 

Rated by 13
2.8

Rated by 16
2.8
 

Rated by 24
2.8

Rated by 10
2.8

Rated by 28
2.8
 

Rated by 11
2.8
 

Rated by 15
2.8

Rated by 40
2.8

Rated by 15
2.7
 

Rated by 11
2.7
 

Please take a moment and make a financial contribution to TheFunded. If we have helped you, help us with resources to further grow the both the site and our entrepreneur training program, The Founder Institute.

Member Post

TheFunded.com is an online community of over 20,000 CEOs, Founders and entrepreneurs to discuss fundraising, rate and review angel investors and venture capitalists, and discuss strategies to grow a startup business. Enjoy the site, and be sure to join us at our Founder Showcase events to meet the community.

Sign-up for Membership

1
Agree
0
Disagree

David Gollaher on Gordon Binder's "Science Lessons"

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by MedTech Expert on 2008-04-30

Tags: Venture Business Vision

PUBLIC:

"Science Lessons: What the Business of BioTech Taught Me About Management" by Gordon Binder, Harvard Business School Press.

The firm (Amgen) was founded in 1980 by six venture capitalists who put up $81,000 each. Their strategy was, by today's standards, incredibly broad: to exploit the new science of genetic engineering for human health...Amgen consisted then of just three people and "couldn't point to any products or patents, only a plan."

One of the books central tenets is that there's never enough money.

Amgen made forays into various fields, from porcine growth hormone to detergent enzymes. None panned out. The company's central focus, however, remained human therapeutics, where it had five potential products. Of these, Binder describes erythropoietin (EPO) as "the runt of the litter."

The rest is history as EPO went on to become Amgen's runaway success making Amgen one of the most successful biotech start-ups of its day.

You can read more of David's review in the current issue of "The Journal of Life Science." It is clear that those building companies in the early 80s were a different breed. Have we become too institutionalized"

PRIVATE: Members Only