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Advice

This section is for entrepreneurs to post general advice on the fundraising process for other entrepreneurs to use. Topics include terms, tactics, and strategies that have proven either effective or ineffective. Help other CEOs succeed with some sage advice from your own experiences.

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Sillicon Valley Resources

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-03-06

Tags: Operations Resources

PUBLIC:

I (did not) want to share some resources in the Silicon Valley for serial start up CXOs:
http://www.tiesv.org, http://www.vctaskforce.com, http://www.sdforum.org and http://www.svase.org - the last one runs a weekly "pitch a VC breakfast" each Thursday.

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Stock in the New Start Up

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by will on 2009-02-14

Tags: Preparation Equity

PUBLIC:

Now that I have seen the dark side of stock rights and the way they can be wiped out for founders, the new startup is being created differently. I am seeking opinions on how others have done it.

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Finding Money Online Through Financing Web Sites

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by SevenX on 2009-02-11

Tags: Funding Sources Intermediaries AngelsSoft

PUBLIC:

[The Founding Member has suggested that this post, originally written in response to a query on the discussion board, be reposted here for broader visibility.]

No web site site can promise to find you money. Period. In fact, perhaps the best way to figure out whether a site is legitimate is the extent to which it DOESN'T promise to find you money!

Of the various possibilities out there, there are realistically four categories, in pretty much the following order:

1) Angelsoft.net: doesn't promise anything, is primarily a site that investors use themselves, doesn't expose any of your information publicly, has by far the best free search engine for legitimate early stage funding sources, and lets you prepare and send applications and videos for free directly to a limited number of screened, legitimate investment groups. If you want to pay $250 extra, you can promote your offering by posting it in a pool that 15,000+ accredited investors (and ONLY accredited investors) can browse through. They publish their stats online, and they show that between 1.3% and 5% of posted deals get funded. So your odds are between 20:1 and 75:1 against. (As Winston Churchill said about democracy: "It's the worst form of government there is...except for all the others.")

2) Vator.tv: the biggest public pitch site, legitimate, but wide open. Good news is that it's free, and that you'll likely get a lot of views of your video. On the other hand, very few of them (if any) will be from legitimate investors. Instead, you'll probably be approached by more than a few service providers, which may (or may not) be what you want, and scammers. But it's good for general exposure, and they are adding a bunch of neat new features, including micro-blogging for company updates so that interested parties can follow your corporate news. So if you're not concerned about the public nature of the site (or if you think that's a good thing), it makes sense. (Just be very, VERY wary of any "funding" leads that result from your posting.)

3) The legitimate attempts at investor matching: there are VERY few of these out there (and virtually all are not in compliance with SEC regulations) including for-profit ones (such as FundingUniverse) and not-for-profits (such as ActiveCapital (the only truly SEC-approved, legit one) and TheFunded's sponsor, IdeaCrossing). They mean well, but have few investors (usually starting from a local group or area: Utah in the case of FundingUniverse, Cleveland, Ohio for IdeaCrossing), and the for-profit ones are not cheap.

4) Everyone else: there are several dozen of these (perhaps even a hundred or more), ranging from out-and-out scams (any one in which you get an instantaneous response promising money, asking for money, or asking for financial information), to sites that function primarily as lead-generators for service providers. I don't personally know of a single company that has had a good experience with FindThatMoney, FundFinder, GoBigNetwork, RaiseCapital, Go4Funding, etc. etc. etc.

The bottom line is that raising capital is very, very (did I say VERY?) tough, particularly in this economy, and only a teeny, tiny fraction of companies will EVER get outside equity financing. The stats suggest that's something like 0.25% for venture money, and 1-2% for angel money.
So anyone who promises you quick and easy money is either well-meaning-but-delusional (the rare exception) or a scumbag-with-a-hand-heading-to-your-pocket (the vast majority.) As a first pass heuristic, if an "angel group" is not listed on either the Angel Capital Association web site (http://www.angelcapitalassociation.or...) or the Angelsoft Group Finder (http://angelsoft.net/entrepreneurs/an...) you should be extremely wary of any claims they make...but then, of course, you would be anyway. Right? Right??

Remember the immortal words of Robert A. Heinlein: "There ain't no such thing as a free lunch."

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Re Position Now?

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Bruce Kasanoff on 2009-01-27

Tags: Preparation Strategy Marketing

PUBLIC:

In the middle of trying to launch a start-up (The Goal Mine), the deepening downturn has pulled me back to a practice (Now Possible) that has become more timely than ever: re-positioning companies.

As I look around the entrepreneurial landscape, what surprises me is how little substantive re-positioning has occurred... yet. The world has shifted, dramatically. The rules have changed. And yet most firms are pretty much still pitching the business model they developed before last fall. 95% of the time, that's not going to work.

This new world creates its own opportunities. All is not gloom and doom, unless you fail to acknowledge how much the rules have changed. Rents are going down. Lots of talent is available. People are willing to take chances (largely because they have no choice.) But at the same time, everyone has both hands on their wallet.

How should your firm re-position itself today? Whatever you decide, that decision should ripple quickly through your pitches, your sales materials, your product/service offerings, and even your pricing sheet.

One thing to keep in mind: hope is not a strategy. Hoping you'll get funding and find customers even though you did not change your positioning, well, that's not much of strategy. Basically, the entire world is taking a 50% pay cut. So what do you do differently?

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Warning: "Inside" Rounds

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-01-25

Tags: Funding Sources Strategy Valuation Crisis

PUBLIC:

As it is becoming harder to raise capital from venture capitalists, existing investors are facing situations where they need to lead new rounds in their own portfolio companies. This presents a big problem for valuations, especially if an investor only has convertible debt. Recently, I've heard a few stories about existing investors promising to lead a round, then pulling out or dramatically changing the terms. Worse, investors will sometimes string you along with a singed term sheet until you are out of cash, and then completely change the deal to take control.

Here are some tips if you think that you are going to need money in the next 18 months.

Know where insiders stand: You need to know where if your insiders will participate or lead a new financing event, and you should also ask them what their specific expectations are for your company performance. Assume that any inside round will be flat.

Pursue other options: Even if your insiders agree to lead a round, you should do your best to have an alternative financing option available. You will never get a fair price for your equity from insiders, since they are pricing, selling, and buying the equity at the same time and since they see all the warts and bruises.

Raise now, not later: Don't wait to raise money. Raising will take twice as long and will be twice as hard in this market. Try to raise enough capital to operate for more than 48 months, if you can.

When in doubt, do debt: If things are not moving fast enough and you have only three or four months worth of cash left, press your existing investors to do a convertible debt round that will give you eight to twelve months of low growth operating capital.

Insider sheet to attract outsiders: If everything else is failing, you may want to have your insiders draft a term sheet with a lot of room for new investors to participate. It's often easier to find outside investors with a "legitimate" term sheet in hand.

Good luck!

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"Home Run" Insanity, but There are Perks

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Jon on 2009-01-20

Tags: Venture Business Crisis Economy

PUBLIC:

According to VentureWire, the number of venture investments in Q4 2008 fell to the lowest level since after the last crash, and the amount of money invested into the whole private equity sector halved from the same quarter last year. Many of the private equity investments being made are in "secondary funds," which buy distressed portfolio positions, so the story for the relatively small segment of venture capital is probably much worse.

The reality on the street for entrepreneurs raising money is brutal. Funds take meetings, but it's clear that they are not really making investments. With limited cash in the bank and limited prospects for raising more capital, it seems that all the good VCs are waiting for a "home run" opportunity to walk in the door and give them a 50% valuation haircut.

There is a silver lining. Deals perceived as being a "home run" have leverage. We just closed a later stage round after nearly a year of fundraising and pulled out over $1 MM for the founders, selling some of our equity. While our valuation was lower than we would like and the terms had some other unwanted teeth, when we threatened to walk, the deal was sweetened. Our traffic numbers are strong, so we had a few VCs coming to us with offers over the last couple months

From what I can gather, the VCs needs to justify making an investment in the current recession, so they have to issue less favorable terms. They can't explain the deal to their partners or investors otherwise. My advice would be to get as much exposure and traction as possible, have a few funds come to you, then target the best investor and negotiate the secondary perks more than the primary terms. Good luck!

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Fees to a Middleman

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by observer on 2009-01-19

Tags: Funding Sources Introductions Fees

PUBLIC:

Just saw a link to the document about a middleman sues a company for not paying all the fees for help in getting funded. I will leave to other parties make a conclusions about ethics of this. However the important part was disclosing the details of the agreement that company had signed with Warren Lieberfarb.
Young companies, especially a first time entrepreneur should be careful with paying such a fee in first place. But even if there is no choice to avoid, in any circumstances such a fees can be infinite

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Be Careful of Partners

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by paloalto on 2009-01-19

Tags: Operations Partners

PUBLIC:

I just read the advice posting regarding vendors, which I agree with for the most part.

I offer the same warning for large partners. We spent several months developing specific features for our application in order to launch a major initiative (major for us) with a large national "partner". A year after the target launch date, the partner still has not delivered. We were to be a key part of their new website release, but they have not released their new website. Two of their website vendors have come and gone out of frustration. They are just dysfunctional internally, more than other large corporations I have worked with. They are also a quasi monopoly, making their employees experts at avoiding any changes, because changes = more work for them, while revenue continues to stream in, at least for now.

Most of our development can be used anyway, but there are specific pieces we spent money and time on that apply only to this partner. Ouch.

Now we are looking at other partners (one is a direct competitor), but we will make sure the partner has enough at stake to instill a sense of urgency in getting it launched.

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Be Careful / Vendors Can Wreck Your Plans

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Anonymous on 2009-01-18

Tags: Operations Vendors Development

PUBLIC:

For those who have recently been funded (for the first time) or bootstrapping with own funds, I write to you personally as fair warning. Be careful putting all your eggs in the performance of one vendor as key to your launch strategies.

We did just this.

Our team worked with a technology vendor to develop our application from Sept 07-Jan 08, which was when this company was to launch our product. It never got completed.

We hired a third party project manager to attempt at salvaging the project and he worked with them until April 08 ~ still nothing. All the while the revenue we were taking in (from our previous beta application) dried up.

The reason I am sharing this is because I just read a post about lawsuits and how long they take / expensive they are. So true. We canceled our contract in April after they still did not perform or deliver. Per our contract they still had 30 days to deliver. Instead they placed a lawsuit on us.

The short of it is over the past 9 months we've dived into financial heartache. No product delivered, nothing $$ returned to us, legal bills and no revenue.

Our contract is pretty iron clad - even encompassing a penalty fee for every day they are overdue with the project. But, how can you fight with the best legal team (ours) against a vendor that has an essentially free team with lots of time on their hands?

My suggestions: if I had this to 'do over' I would say --

My due diligence would have been much more in-depth to include our attorney pulling a complete past history at the county, state and national level of this firm. I would have requested more direct client referrals to check out. Also, I will never give money to a firm again until a product is delivered - no matter how large the scale. We actually gave them a security deposit which we've not seen since.

Lastly, I would have actually hired my own internal team vs a firm - even if it were temporary, to complete this project. Our own team would have been underfoot and where I could reach out, touch base and keep dibs on their time management.

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Layoffs are Coming to Venture Capital Soon

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2009-01-04

Tags: Venture Business Crisis

PUBLIC:

I just got off the phone with a friend who is founder/CEO of an early stage medical device company. His company is doing well and recently received a couple of term sheets for his first institutional round. As he was going through the process of negotiating with the potential investors, he said they were trying to set his expectations low. He told me a story about how one investor recounted tales of startups making mass layoffs, cutting back everywhere and generally dire conditions (basically sending the message that he should be happy to be getting an offer).

So my friend responded, "Wow, that sounds terrible. This must be really affecting you badly...how many people have you had to layoff here""

The VC stared at him with a bewildered look.

Read more here.

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A Round Valuations Down 25 50% While B and C Rounds Non Existent

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2008-12-10

Tags: Venture Business Valuation Venture Debt Convertible Debt

PUBLIC:

More here.

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Wsj Article on Capital Call Crunch

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by forrational on 2008-12-08

Tags: Venture Business Limited Partners

PUBLIC:

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB12286..."mod=googlenews_wsj

Bootstrapping is looking better and better.

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Startup Failures on the Rise

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2008-12-05

Tags: Operations Bankruptcy Crisis

PUBLIC:

I just finished writing this post about how startup failures are up. Not surprisingly Q4 2008 (already) is the biggest month for startup failures in the past 10 quarters.

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Just Get Through 2009

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Anonymous on 2008-12-04

Tags: Operations Crisis Burn Rate

PUBLIC:

I'm fundraising right now and it is absolutely brutal. I want to to tell all entrepreneurs, "Fight through this. You can raise capital." But that isn't true. You may not be able to raise capital until 2010 no matter how good your product or company is. It is not a reflection of you, just the external factors that are largely out of your control.

Survive until 2010 and position your company to take off as the next economic cycle does. These things always come back. While it is bad now, it will eventually get better. The Wall Street guys will get tired of losing money and companies will start hiring again.

I hope I am wrong. (Boy, do I hope I'm wrong.) Maybe Obama will follow through on his plan to eliminate capital gains tax on investments to startups. That would help us immensely. But I have heard nothing about that since it was mentioned during the campaign.

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The Limited Partner Shuffle: It Affects You...

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Mr. Smith on 2008-12-02

Tags: Venture Business Limited Partners

PUBLIC:

Investors in venture funds, called limited partners, are pulling out or selling their commitments to provide essential capital to the venture model, causing the "Limited Partner Shuffle." Some experts are quoted as saying as much as 10% of all private equity positions will change hands this year in hasty transactions to generate liquidity, including premium positions by top-tier institutions like Harvard. See below:

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news"pid=newsarchive&sid=azBqn85_aRXE

What does this mean and why is it relevant to entrepreneurs" A quick overview of venture capital will help to answer these questions.

Venture firms raise money to invest from limited partners (LPs), who are normally endowments, pension funds, insurance companies, and other institutions that manage large amounts of capital. An investment in venture capital is considered a high risk asset class with the potential for high returns. The professional consulting firms that publish guidelines for how limited partners should allocate money across asset classes generally recommend that a small portion go into venture capital, sometimes less than 1%. This small percentage still amounts to many billions of dollars per year being entrusted to venture firms by limited partners, who control trillions of dollars.

Generally speaking, a commitment to invest in a venture fund does not require the limited partner to transfer money until the venture firm makes an investment in a portfolio company. So, a $100 MM venture fund does not have $100 MM sitting in the bank. Instead, as venture firms make successive investments, they collect money from their limited partners and distribute that money to portfolio companies in rounds. To cover operating expenses, the venture firms separately collect approximately 2% of the invested capital as a management fee.

In order to ensure that each limited partner honors their obligation to provide money when needed, which is referred to as a capital call, venture funds implement onerous terms for forfeit or default. The most common default protection is to wipe out any returns from all previous invested capital. This encourages an active secondary market for limited partner positions, since it makes more sense to sell a commitment than to lose the value of the money invested to date.

Fast forward to Q4 2008, and you have the perfect storm of venture capital destruction. First, a relatively large number of limited partners, such as AIG and Lehman Brothers, are facing solvency issues, and they can no longer honor any capital calls to venture capital funds. The large scale dissolution of limited partners is something new.

Second, as the equity and debt markets have collapsed, the allocation of limited partners to venture capital has increased as a percentage. If an LP has $1 billion under management and 1%, or $10 MM, committed to venture capital and if that $1 billion suddenly becomes $500 MM, the allocation schedule of 1% stipulates that the LP now only invest $5 MM into venture capital. Many LPs have charters that strictly govern these percentages, forcing the LP to sell commitments in the secondary market to comply.

Third, many potential buyers in the secondary market have liquidity issues of their own. The purchase of a commitment requires resources to buy the asset, resources to pay for future capital calls, and resources to cover management fees at a time where the future is uncertain. The lack of liquidity and uncertainty has caused a collapse in the secondary market values, with many commitments selling for $.50 on the invested dollar or less. This in turn has encouraged limited partners that might otherwise commit to new positions in venture funds to consider purchasing discounted positions in existing funds.

Lastly, venture capital returns have been hard hit by the downturn, reducing or eliminating the ability of certain funds to get back any of the original invested capital. Portfolio company acquisitions are on hold, and the IPO market is frozen. For many limited partners, investing more money into certain venture firms is literally throwing good money after bad when cash is king.

Most venture firms worldwide are facing problems as a result of this "Limited Partner Shuffle." The best firms are distracted by helping limited partners transfer commitments. Other firms will cease making investments for some period of time, possibly forever. Still other firms will not be able to collect their management fees and go under in the next fews months. Nearly everyone will be fundraising and spending a lot less time with their portfolio companies.

Many entrepreneurs are now pitching firms without a future, wasting invaluable time. These "Walking Dead Funds" are going through the motions until the other shoe drops, forcing them out of business. Other entrepreneurs are counting on investments or participation from funds that have no ability to deliver any capital. Lastly, there are entrepreneurs with soon-to-be-insolvent firms that hold controlling preferred equity positions and Board seats, leaving a potentially deadly vacancy in governance and voting control. How do you sell when your primary shareholder is no longer around to grant approval"

As an entrepreneur in today's market, you need to understand the relative health of the investors that you deal with. Start by asking them directly about their financial resources and the state of their limited partners. Don't hesitate to ask other entrepreneurs and other funds as well. You future may depend on having good information about the solvency of investors that you deal with.

[Please reprint any or all of this post. Entrepreneurs need to know.]

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A Pitch is a Conversation Not a Lecture

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by sparrow on 2008-11-20

Tags: Pitching Strategy Style

PUBLIC:

It's an easy trap to fall into. You've labored on your powerpoint presentation, you got nice graphics into it, you followed Guy's advice http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2005/12/t..., you practiced your pitch, and now you're ready to rock and roll.

You're a little nervous but feeling good. You go in and start your presentation, and you're on slide two, and the VC asks "What's the business model here""
No problem, you're ready for him. "I'll get to it on slide 7, let's go through the product first."

Stop! I know it' s hard to change the flow, but expect to do it. Go ahead and jump to slide 7 and give him 10 seconds to read the slide and then explain the model. 10 seconds should be enough since you don't have that much text on a slide, or you shouldn't and even if you did, it wouldn't matter since most VCs have ADD and won't take more than 10 seconds to read anything. The one exception is anything related to finance. But to get back to my main point (VCs are not the only ones with ADD), focus on what the other side is interested in and answer the questions in the order that they are presented.
Usually, one question will lead to the next and you'll find that you're referring to the presentation as support material rather than guiding the discussion.
So why do you need the powerpoint deck" As I just mentioned, it's support material, but it also helps you make sure you've covered everything. When things slow down in the conversation or when your time is almost up, go back through the presentation, and double check that you haven't missed any critical information.
As part of the conversation you'll hear some criticism or doubt about your product, your direction or something else in the presentation. Your gut reaction is to argue, mine is. They're not getting it. Stop yourself. Instead ask question to help you clarify why their thinking is different than yours. There are several reasons to do this.
1. They don't know your company and probably the space it's in nearly as well as you do. On the other hand, they've been exposed to a lot more companies than you have. You're getting free advice. Listen to it and try to absorb. I've talked to three VCs in the last 4 weeks, and two of them gave me good insight which helps me fine tune my model.
2. If they have this objection other VCs might have it too. Listen, learnd and maybe next time you do a pitch you'll be better prepared to answer this issue, or tackle it in your presentation.
3. Arguing has the potential of making you look defensive and uncooperative. Will they really want to invest in someone with these traits.

Having said that, if they challenge one of the basic assumptions of your plan and you've considered and rejected their arguments, it's perfectly OK to present this. "Yes, we've heard from other people that they thought that the markets can't be any bigger than 250,00 users, but actually a Gartner report in Feb of 2008 shows that there are at least 5,000,000. The reason the market is understimated is that most of these people are in Asia and the web analytics don't count them."
Here you scored a point. You thought of the problem researched it, and can provide supporting data.

In summary, try to reach a good balance of give and take. Talk about your product, show that you're excited about it, but listen. I certainly try to.

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Adeo in La

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Spouse of msjane on 2008-11-08

Tags: TheFunded.com

PUBLIC:

Adeo was the morning's speaker at METal's Sat. breakfast meetings in Marina Del Rey.

He painted a sobering yet opportunity-laden year ahead for anyone who is thinking about seeking VC for their enterprise.

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Adeo Rocks!

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2008-11-08

Tags: TheFunded.com

PUBLIC:

Earlier this week I spent several hours in a couple of meetings with Adeo Ressi, the Founding Member. Adeo is a very cool, very smart guy and it was both enlightening and fun meeting with him.

More here.

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Understand (And Avoid if You Can) the "Voting as a Single Class" Trick

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Nand on 2008-11-04

Tags: Negotiation Terms

PUBLIC:

There is some similarity between this and the elections, so it's a good time to discuss this.

What does "Voting as a single class" means for you (and other small investors) " and don't get it wrong, you may be a big shareholder today, but you must think like the small shareholder you will be down the road.

Here is an example of how a VC with 20% of the shares can force a decision on all the other shareholders and investors, most of which are against that decision.

The lead VC has 20% of the shares (5% B shares+ 15% C Shares)
The lead VC wants to force a decision, the rest of the shareholders are 80:20 against it.

There are 30% series C shares and 20% series B shares. the rest are common and options (who don't vote).

The holders of the C shares vote first, the decision, forced by the lead VC wins (although 40% of the C shares are against). but all of them are now "voting together as a single class", e.g. casting all their votes in favor of the decision.

The holders of the B shares do the same, they are against the decision (80:20) they "vote together as a single class" against the lead VC.

Then there is a second vote. The "holders of the preferred shares", although most of the holders of the preferred shares are against, and although all the B shares votes are against the decision. All "the holders of the preferred shares" are now forced to vote for the decision.

Now all the preferred shares vote together for the decision, although most of the holders of shares and most of the investors were against it.

The VC, with it's 20% of shares, against the will of most of the other investors and most of the shareholders can force a decision.

Try and use the smaller VCs to remove this from the investment agreements.
They will tell you this is only inserted to simplify things, they will describe situations where some retired employee can influence the decisions and so on. Remeber, this is just another mechanism to give power to the biggest shareholder (who, in the long run, is not you).

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The Definition of Traction

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Mr. Smith on 2008-11-03

Tags: Pitching Traction

PUBLIC:

Traction is the buzzword of fundraising these days. It is required by many, and understood by few. Here is an attempt at defining traction for all parties in the fundraising cycle.

1. The Idea: How strong is the fundamental idea and underlying revenue model" Does it make complete sense, and is it backed up by published industry data"

2. The Team: Have you assembled a group of domain experts that can execute the idea and the model" How seasoned are the experts that you have assembled"

3. The Prototype: Do you have a prototype of your offering that is compelling to the target audience" How polished is the prototype"

4. The Launch: What is the reaction among trade journals and other media outlets regarding your product launch" Is it well covered and well regarded"

5. The Adoption: How many target customers have adopted your offering and is the growth rate substantial" Are you experiencing a high level of customer satisfaction or a concerning level of churn"

6: The Revenue: Have you started to derive revenue from your offering and is that revenue either ahead or behind or model assumptions" What variables have changed from your assumptions"

7. The Profitability: How profitable or near profitable is your model once in operation, and are there untapped revenue opportunities for future revenue growth"

8. The IPO: How long until you can take your company public, assuming two years of fast growth, audited financials, and profitability or near profitability"

Most venture capitalists, for better or for worse, tend to invest in phases 4 and 5. VCs like the potential upside without the too much details from phase 6, though many investments occur at the start of phase 6, before any details can be conclusively determined. Any other thoughts"

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The "Perfect" Pitch Deck

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by Mr. Smith on 2008-10-27

Tags: Preparation Materials

PUBLIC:

Having done over 150 investor pitches across five companies, a concise and well-organized deck is critical to success. No deck will be "perfect," but here is what I learned.

First, the deck should evolve as you meet with investors and evaluate their reaction to each slide, so use version numbers with the file to avoid confusion when sending the deck around. Next, avoid revealing confidential information, such as pending business deals or secret release features. Finally, make sure that each slide is very concise, using one line of text per bullet and no more than six bullets per slide. If possible, use graphics or a chart instead of text.

The whole deck should take 20 to 30 minutes to get through without questions, assuming that half of the meeting will be questions. The ten slides that you need, in my experience, are:

    1. Vision: What are you trying to do, and why are you doing it"

    2. Market: What is the market you are addressing and the estimated value of this market over the next 5 to 10 years"

    3. Team: Who are the key three to five executives (Vision, Operations, Tech, Sales, Marketing), and what are their specific qualifications in the target market"

    4. Offering: What is your exact offering" If possible, present a three to five minute pre-recorded video demonstration.

    5. Roadmap: Where are you in your offering release cycle and with respect to gaining traction"

    6. Deals: What are your major partnerships, relationships, etc." This slide should include various logos.

    7. Differentiation: How are you different from your three main competitors" This slide should have a simple table.

    8. Stats: What are the basic statistics of your company (Round, Investors, Employees, Location)"

    9. Financials: What is your high-level projected P&L for the next two years plus the current and previous year, if available"

    10. Capital: How much capital are you raising and what will it be used for"

This type of simple presentation has always worked for me. Please add any other ideas or lessons that have worked for you.

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Lessons From the Last Crash

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2008-10-27

Tags: Operations Crisis

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It's pretty rare that during a crash and recession there are employees and managers with recent experience on how to handle the situation. Well, the "good news" with the Great Depression 2.0 is that a whole bunch of us have relatively fresh experience. Last time the financial grenade went off in our lap. This time, we're collateral damage, which means it should be less painful assuming similar size crashes (which is looking less and less like a valid assumption).

In any event, here are some lessons I learned from the last time through this mess:

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2008 Startup Compensation Survey Results

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2008-10-24

Tags: Operations Compensation

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First Agree on a Second Date Before Trying to Meet the Parents

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by RichieBlueEyes on 2008-10-14

Tags: Pitching Strategy Terms

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This is basic advice, applicable to any sales situation and a mistake people often make. If you are meeting a potential client (or investor) first make sure they are interested in your product (your company) and agree to go out again (meet again) and provide more background on yourself (your materials) before trying to to sneak into the bedroom and score (discuss terms). Often times terms come up early, I'd recommend saying "first lets see if we click before talking specifics" and drag it out a bit... a meeting or two .... before talking numbers. This way, you know there is an actual interest, potentially leading to a term sheet before entering any type of negotiation which can cause the whole thing to go sour if there is a disagreement. However, if you already are all over each other, you're more likely to settle the disagreement then storm away unhappy. This holds true for selling anything. First gain interest, then sell. Many people just jump the gun and try to sell before knowing if they customer wants anything and while it can work, it changes the tide of leverage.

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Triage

TheFunded.com Advice

Posted by fnazeeri on 2008-10-12

Tags: Operations Crisis

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http://www.altgate.com/blog/2008/10/triage.html

I just wrote this post on how venture investors decide which companies in their portfolio to let die, continue to fund or leave alone.

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